The government has warned teachers not to leak information about the upcoming national exams, which begin in March.

The Basic Education Principal Secretary Julius Jwan named Migori, Kisii, Nyamira, and Homa Bay as counties where teachers open examination papers with the intent of leaking them to students.

“We have put in place measures to ensure examinations are not leaked and let nobody think they can outwit us,” Jwan said.

Last year during the 2020 National examinations, 27 teachers were fired for leaking exam papers.

Nancy Macharia, CEO of the Teachers Service Commission (TSC), has also issued a stern warning to teachers against assisting students in cheating in upcoming national examinations.

She said teachers must ensure that students are adequately prepared for the national tests.

She also challenged principals to find solutions to exam phobia, which she identified as one of the causes of recent school unrest that resulted in the burning of over 30 school dormitories.

Jwan urged Kenyans to support the implementation of CBC, claiming that the 8-4-4 curriculum failed to recognize the competencies and skills of students who performed poorly in exams.

“The curriculum being phased is majorly focused on examinations which was a disadvantage for the for the students who have other skills,” said Jwan.

He contended that the CBC is built on developing talent. “Unlike the other curriculum, CBC is nurturing skills and

He was accompanied by Odoyo Owidi, the chairman of the Lake Basin Development Authority, who urged the government to establish a clear policy on when a school should own a bus.

Owidi expressed concern that while many schools in the area have buses, they lack essential infrastructures such as classrooms, dormitories, and dining halls.

As the country embraces new education reforms in preparation for the transition next year, two separate sets of national examinations will be administered this year.

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